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Today's Inspiration

June 1, 2010
Look at this thinking man! Is he a screenwriter? A novelist? A commercial director? Or just a guy whose job requires him to have eyes burning with intensity and sophisticated lighting equipment arranged around him? 
July can’t come soon enough! 

Look at this thinking man! Is he a screenwriter? A novelist? A commercial director? Or just a guy whose job requires him to have eyes burning with intensity and sophisticated lighting equipment arranged around him? 

July can’t come soon enough! 

10:00am  |  15 notes   |  smoking |  advertising 
December 25, 2009
If Marlboros are for Cowboys then Lucky Strike is For Magical Men.
Leo Burnett, creator of the Marlboro man, was once asked why he smoked Marlboro cigarettes. Burnett responded: “ I guess my feeling is pretty well summed up in the remarks of the vice-president of a competitive agency. When asked why he was smoking a not-too-popular brand of cigarette: ‘In my book there is no taste or aroma quite like bread and butter.’ “
This ad is from the 1936 Lucky Strike print campaign.

If Marlboros are for Cowboys then Lucky Strike is For Magical Men.

Leo Burnett, creator of the Marlboro man, was once asked why he smoked Marlboro cigarettes. Burnett responded: “ I guess my feeling is pretty well summed up in the remarks of the vice-president of a competitive agency. When asked why he was smoking a not-too-popular brand of cigarette: ‘In my book there is no taste or aroma quite like bread and butter.’ “

This ad is from the 1936 Lucky Strike print campaign.

9:57pm  |  43 notes   |  lucky strike |  mad men season 1 |  smoking |  advertising 
November 25, 2009
Here’s a camel Ad 1963 that encourages you to smoke after every dish. A crisp Waldorf salad and then a blended turkish? Or say, how about some creamy soup and then a fresh Camel to ease digestion? The possibilities are endless!
The Reader’s Digest piece that brought the whole lung cancer smoking causation to the fore, the one that Don and Lucky Strike folks fretted about in the pilot, came out about 4 years before the above pictured ad. So even after the influential article, the paradigm of ‘smoke because it’s good for you!’ hadn’t quite shifted.
Some background on the idea of smoking being bad for you:
In 1954, an organization called the TIRC (Tobacco Industry Research Committee) was formed to investigate “the growing health scare” related to smoking. They published a piece that ran in 43 newspapers entitled ”A Frank Message to Cigarette Smokers”, part of which stated:
“RECENT REPORTS on experiments with mice have given wide publicity to a theory that cigarette smoking is in some way linked with lung cancer in human beings.
Although conducted by doctors of professional standing, these experiments are not regarded as conclusive in the field of cancer research. However, we do not believe results are inconclusive, should be disregarded or lightly dismissed. At the same time, we feel it is in the public interest to call attention to the fact that eminent doctors and research scientists have publicly questioned the claimed significance of these experiments.
In 1957, the Surgeon General declared there to be a link between smoking and cancer, stating, “It is clear that there is an increasing and consistent body of evidence that excessive cigarette smoking is one of the causative factors in lung cancer.” Many medical journals stop carrying advertisements for cigarettes at this time.So there was indeed an awareness that smoking was not, per se, good for you anymore, but attitudes would take a while to change.
• image via Footnotes Lifeblood Raza Syed

Here’s a camel Ad 1963 that encourages you to smoke after every dish. A crisp Waldorf salad and then a blended turkish? Or say, how about some creamy soup and then a fresh Camel to ease digestion? The possibilities are endless!

The Reader’s Digest piece that brought the whole lung cancer smoking causation to the fore, the one that Don and Lucky Strike folks fretted about in the pilot, came out about 4 years before the above pictured ad. So even after the influential article, the paradigm of ‘smoke because it’s good for you!’ hadn’t quite shifted.

Some background on the idea of smoking being bad for you:

In 1954, an organization called the TIRC (Tobacco Industry Research Committee) was formed to investigate “the growing health scare” related to smoking. They published a piece that ran in 43 newspapers entitled ”A Frank Message to Cigarette Smokers”, part of which stated:

RECENT REPORTS on experiments with mice have given wide publicity to a theory that cigarette smoking is in some way linked with lung cancer in human beings.

Although conducted by doctors of professional standing, these experiments are not regarded as conclusive in the field of cancer research. However, we do not believe results are inconclusive, should be disregarded or lightly dismissed. At the same time, we feel it is in the public interest to call attention to the fact that eminent doctors and research scientists have publicly questioned the claimed significance of these experiments.

In 1957, the Surgeon General declared there to be a link between smoking and cancer, stating, “It is clear that there is an increasing and consistent body of evidence that excessive cigarette smoking is one of the causative factors in lung cancer.” Many medical journals stop carrying advertisements for cigarettes at this time.

So there was indeed an awareness that smoking was not, per se, good for you anymore, but attitudes would take a while to change.

• image via Footnotes Lifeblood Raza Syed

9:46pm  |  42 notes   |  smoking |  advertising 
November 17, 2009
Old Gold knows about your death wish. 
• footnote - by Natasha Simons

Old Gold knows about your death wish.

• footnote - by Natasha Simons

1:37pm  |  21 notes   |  death wish |  advertising |  season 1 |  smoking |  old golds 
Pete Campbell shows his upstart tendencies early on in season one when he takes that supremely German woman’s research out of Don’s trash to try to impress the Lucky Strike executives. Not surprisingly, the research is uber-Freudian in nature, discussing the controversial “death wish” theory.
Freud posited that, after World War One, people’s desire to live was counterbalanced by a sublimated aggressive streak, known colloquially as the death instinct. This instinct stemmed from a form of masochism, a wish to destroy the corporeal body.Our German lady thinks maybe this can hoity-toity up the Lucky Strike advertising! Don disagrees, because — well because you try to peddle some of that European fancy talk on a farm hand like Don and you know he is NOT IMPRESSED. Pete, on the other hand, is looking forward to an age of counter-intuitive advertising (and relying a little bit on machismo), and applies the research to smoking; if they can’t say smoking is healthy anymore, maybe they should embrace the risks. Maybe a real man would like to destroy his lungs from the inside out! Or something. The idea is definitely raw, and the Lees of Lucky Strike pretty much decide Pete’s a little crazy for even suggesting it.
Although Lee Jr. knows a little something about self-destructive urges, no?
• footnote - by Natasha Simons


Pete Campbell shows his upstart tendencies early on in season one when he takes that supremely German woman’s research out of Don’s trash to try to impress the Lucky Strike executives. Not surprisingly, the research is uber-Freudian in nature, discussing the controversial “death wish” theory.

Freud posited that, after World War One, people’s desire to live was counterbalanced by a sublimated aggressive streak, known colloquially as the death instinct. This instinct stemmed from a form of masochism, a wish to destroy the corporeal body.

Our German lady thinks maybe this can hoity-toity up the Lucky Strike advertising! Don disagrees, because — well because you try to peddle some of that European fancy talk on a farm hand like Don and you know he is NOT IMPRESSED. Pete, on the other hand, is looking forward to an age of counter-intuitive advertising (and relying a little bit on machismo), and applies the research to smoking; if they can’t say smoking is healthy anymore, maybe they should embrace the risks. Maybe a real man would like to destroy his lungs from the inside out! Or something. The idea is definitely raw, and the Lees of Lucky Strike pretty much decide Pete’s a little crazy for even suggesting it.

Although Lee Jr. knows a little something about self-destructive urges, no?

• footnote - by Natasha Simons

1:29pm  |  24 notes   |  Don Draper |  Peter Campbell |  death wish |  freud |  lucky strike |  mad men season 1 |  psychiatry |  smoking |  Don Draper 
October 14, 2009
Compare these super girly Lucky Strike ads to the decidedly NOT SO here.

Compare these super girly Lucky Strike ads to the decidedly NOT SO here.

2:55pm  |  10 notes   |  Advertising |  Lucky Strike |  smoking 
October 13, 2009
*hard blink*

*hard blink*

1:17am  |  22 notes   |  Lucky Strike |  Advertising |  Smoking 
Oh dear!
This is a 1963 Lucky Strike print ad. The 'It's Toasted' slogan seems to be a 1954 print campaign (Also? Kind of girly!). Starting in 1961 the thrust of the Lucky Strike advertisements were more along the lines of “SMOKING, IT’S WHAT MANLY MEN DO.”
Hunters, farmers, fishermen, and men of worthy of a hard won stubble dominated the images — with the requiste the 1,000 foot stare.
Wonder what he’s staring at?

Oh dear!

This is a 1963 Lucky Strike print ad. The 'It's Toasted' slogan seems to be a 1954 print campaign (Also? Kind of girly!). Starting in 1961 the thrust of the Lucky Strike advertisements were more along the lines of “SMOKING, IT’S WHAT MANLY MEN DO.”

Hunters, farmers, fishermen, and men of worthy of a hard won stubble dominated the images — with the requiste the 1,000 foot stare.

Wonder what he’s staring at?

1:04am  |  16 notes   |  Lucky Strike |  Advertising |  Smoking 
August 28, 2009

Then there’s the square-dancing un-toasted version:

For smoking that you’re bound to like/you just can’t beat a Lucky Strike!”

Yeehaw. 

9:22pm  |  2 notes   |  Lucky Strike |  Smoking |  Advertising 
August 24, 2009
We hope Roger gets to go to the wedding.

We hope Roger gets to go to the wedding.

3:29pm  |  38 notes   |  smoking |  advertising