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August 6, 2010
Another quick note on the Italian hospital posing as Roger Sterling’s office! His young bride might not know how to handle her liquor, but she’s clearly got an eye for architectural trends. His desk chair is an Eames, and the others are Eero Saarinen tulip chairs. Saarinen, a Finnish architect, is best-known for his simple, sweeping, arching structural curves—St. Louis arch, anyone?

He died in 1961, and a year later his masterpiece was open to the public—the TWA terminal at JFK airport, a structure Yale Architecture dean Robert A.M. Stern called ‘the Grand Central of the Jet Age’. 

One can hardly think of a designer whose ethos is more suited to support (literally!) our SCDP comrades as they march into the future.

*Footnote by Angela Serratore

Another quick note on the Italian hospital posing as Roger Sterling’s office! His young bride might not know how to handle her liquor, but she’s clearly got an eye for architectural trends. His desk chair is an Eames, and the others are Eero Saarinen tulip chairs. Saarinen, a Finnish architect, is best-known for his simple, sweeping, arching structural curves—St. Louis arch, anyone?



He died in 1961, and a year later his masterpiece was open to the public—the TWA terminal at JFK airport, a structure Yale Architecture dean Robert A.M. Stern called ‘the Grand Central of the Jet Age’. 

One can hardly think of a designer whose ethos is more suited to support (literally!) our SCDP comrades as they march into the future.

*Footnote by Angela Serratore

4:48am  |  30 notes   |  Decor |  travel |  design |  Roger Sterling |  Angela Serratore 
August 2, 2010
A quick note on Roger’s hyper modern office: the notion is tranquility through minimalism; uninterrupted lines, efficient instead of ornate design, neutral colors thought to soothe the eye and spirit: the critique of this sort of modernism is that it goes too far in soothing and actually numbs those who are exposed to it. It can become a visual novocaine that makes the visitor sedated but not relaxed.

A quick note on Roger’s hyper modern office: the notion is tranquility through minimalism; uninterrupted lines, efficient instead of ornate design, neutral colors thought to soothe the eye and spirit: the critique of this sort of modernism is that it goes too far in soothing and actually numbs those who are exposed to it. It can become a visual novocaine that makes the visitor sedated but not relaxed.

11:44pm  |  222 notes   |  Decor |  Roger Sterling |  Modern 
July 19, 2010
Color schemes of 1965 — so daring! Look at those swatches. Could you imagine the orange/brown/green pattern spread out over a colonial revival home? That blue and yellow is already pretty ballsy.
Look at the little ornaments on the sidetable. Chinoiserie influenced?
My curiosity about this Jay Poole guy is aroused. 
Of course, the best part about this ad: Blanche’s hair. 

Color schemes of 1965 — so daring! Look at those swatches. Could you imagine the orange/brown/green pattern spread out over a colonial revival home? That blue and yellow is already pretty ballsy.

Look at the little ornaments on the sidetable. Chinoiserie influenced?

My curiosity about this Jay Poole guy is aroused. 

Of course, the best part about this ad: Blanche’s hair

January 5, 2010
Mmmmm look at those tasty apricot-colored pillows!
Most homes built in the early 1900’s, like the Drapers, were relatively stripped down and lacked 18th century flourishes of the older homes. To achieve the traditional Colonial style during the mid-century, designers and homemakers were instructed to “paint the walls a soft tint such as ivory, parchment, green, or apricot.”  Additional touches such as small period details, fabric, lighting, and small Colonial style furniture including tilt-top tables, the rush seated chairs, were encouraged.
image via this really great interview.

Mmmmm look at those tasty apricot-colored pillows!

Most homes built in the early 1900’s, like the Drapers, were relatively stripped down and lacked 18th century flourishes of the older homes. To achieve the traditional Colonial style during the mid-century, designers and homemakers were instructed to “paint the walls a soft tint such as ivory, parchment, green, or apricot.”  Additional touches such as small period details, fabric, lighting, and small Colonial style furniture including tilt-top tables, the rush seated chairs, were encouraged.

image via this really great interview.

5:15pm  |  23 notes   |  decor |  draper living room |  mad men furniture |  mad men season 3 |  season 3 |  design 
December 16, 2009
You guys, let’s be honest: in our heart of hearts, don’t we all just want the Don Drapers of our lives to take us out to LUTECE?
Lutece opened in 1961 to great acclaim, so it’s no wonder Don and Roger try to go there so often. It was founded by early celeb chef Andre Soltner who remained head chef and owner until closing. From their now defunct website: “The restaurant offers a variety of settings including Le Jardin, which is the main dining room, and two unique private rooms on the second floor of a townhouse appointed with hand-gilded suede walls and crystal chandeliers to create the perfect intimate setting for guest’s enjoyment.”

Sample Menu (so delish):AppetizersPheasant Soup & Poached Quenellewith green lentils, endive & arugulaCaviar Soupwith Madeleine Island bay scallops, cauliflower mousseline & poached quail eggChestnuts & Porcini Mushroomscooked en cocotte with grilled pancetta & roasted chicken jusArtichoke Saladwith ruby red grapefruit vinaigrette, thai basilBrittany Langoustineswatercress civet, gold beets & shaved winter black truffleYukon Gold Potato & Winter Black Truffle PiesabayonEntreesPan Seared Lacquered Monkfishwith nicoise olive sauce, baby bok choy, chick pea puree & lemon confitRoasted Turbot on the Bonewith ginger & parmesan, tarbais beans with fresh tomato concasse & arugulaSauteed Black Sea Basswith baby spinach, vanilla jusSauteed Lobsterwith sauteed foie gras wrapped in a chard leaf,braised savoy cabbage, grapes & fennelSauteed Partridgepoached foie gras wrapped in a chard leaf,braised savoy cabbage, grapes & fennelRoasted Farm Raised Chickenpommes macaires, black truffle jus
It had three main dining rooms, called Le Jardin, Le Petit Salon, and Le Grand Salon. The Drapers and such did not eat in Le Jardin, because there didn’t seem to be any green and yellow accents.
In the 60s, Julia Child called Lutece the greatest restaurant in the United States.
Here’s the NY Times article on its closing which discusses how Lutece always got most of its business from business lunches and dinners.
• footnote - by Natasha Simons

You guys, let’s be honest: in our heart of hearts, don’t we all just want the Don Drapers of our lives to take us out to LUTECE?

Lutece opened in 1961 to great acclaim, so it’s no wonder Don and Roger try to go there so often. It was founded by early celeb chef Andre Soltner who remained head chef and owner until closing. From their now defunct website: “The restaurant offers a variety of settings including Le Jardin, which is the main dining room, and two unique private rooms on the second floor of a townhouse appointed with hand-gilded suede walls and crystal chandeliers to create the perfect intimate setting for guest’s enjoyment.”


Sample Menu (so delish):

Appetizers
Pheasant Soup & Poached Quenelle
with green lentils, endive & arugula

Caviar Soup
with Madeleine Island bay scallops, cauliflower mousseline & poached quail egg

Chestnuts & Porcini Mushrooms
cooked en cocotte with grilled pancetta & roasted chicken jus

Artichoke Salad
with ruby red grapefruit vinaigrette, thai basil

Brittany Langoustines
watercress civet, gold beets & shaved winter black truffle

Yukon Gold Potato & Winter Black Truffle Pie
sabayon

Entrees
Pan Seared Lacquered Monkfish
with nicoise olive sauce, baby bok choy, chick pea puree & lemon confit

Roasted Turbot on the Bone
with ginger & parmesan, tarbais beans with fresh tomato concasse & arugula

Sauteed Black Sea Bass
with baby spinach, vanilla jus

Sauteed Lobster
with sauteed foie gras wrapped in a chard leaf,
braised savoy cabbage, grapes & fennel

Sauteed Partridge
poached foie gras wrapped in a chard leaf,
braised savoy cabbage, grapes & fennel

Roasted Farm Raised Chicken
pommes macaires, black truffle jus



It had three main dining rooms, called Le Jardin, Le Petit Salon, and Le Grand Salon. The Drapers and such did not eat in Le Jardin, because there didn’t seem to be any green and yellow accents.

In the 60s, Julia Child called Lutece the greatest restaurant in the United States.

Here’s the NY Times article on its closing which discusses how Lutece always got most of its business from business lunches and dinners.

• footnote - by Natasha Simons

9:43pm  |  26 notes   |  lutece |  mad men |  season 1 |  decor 
November 26, 2009
"The draperies may be brightly colored and gaily patterned. The Colonials used fewer draperies than we do today, but, without marring the atmosphere, we may use, with good effect, pretty chintzes in the small patterns." Suggested window treatments were often simple scrim or dotted Swiss with a white cotton ball fringe. 
Do not fuck up the simple scrim, Don!

"The draperies may be brightly colored and gaily patterned. The Colonials used fewer draperies than we do today, but, without marring the atmosphere, we may use, with good effect, pretty chintzes in the small patterns." Suggested window treatments were often simple scrim or dotted Swiss with a white cotton ball fringe.

Do not fuck up the simple scrim, Don!


6:46pm  |  5 notes   |  Mad Men Season 1 |  colonial revival |  decor |  design 
On colonial revival style
"During the 1920s, manufacturers flocked to the market with various pieces of furniture designed to satisfy this desire for tradition and stability. Such furniture as butterfly tables, Windsor chairs, and candlestands abounded. Vignette decorating strategies included a wingback armchair with a small splay-legged table for reading or enjoying the fire. Other pieces included drop-front secretaries and plate racks."
Ah! Tradition and Stability, come get it while it’s hot!

On colonial revival style

"During the 1920s, manufacturers flocked to the market with various pieces of furniture designed to satisfy this desire for tradition and stability. Such furniture as butterfly tables, Windsor chairs, and candlestands abounded. Vignette decorating strategies included a wingback armchair with a small splay-legged table for reading or enjoying the fire. Other pieces included drop-front secretaries and plate racks."

Ah! Tradition and Stability, come get it while it’s hot!

6:44pm  |  10 notes   |  Mad Men season 1 |  decor |  design |  furniture |  colonial revival 
When you think of the prototypical 1960’s home you might think of something space- agey. All streamlined, geometric and monochromatic. Or maybe something shaggy with dingbats. But how wrong you would be (shame yourself. do it now)!
Most suburban homes in the early mid-century still clung to a colonial revival decor. Colonial revival (a less frilly but still traditional) style was considered stately, high class, and warm. There would be some flip accents sure (note Betty’s textiles: the curtains and blankets are more on the whimiscal side).
Most homes built in the early 1900’s, like the Drapers,  were relatively stripped down and lacked 18th century flourishes of the older homes. To achieve the traditional Colonial style designers and home makers were instructed to “paint the walls a soft tint such as ivory, parchment, green, or apricot.” . Additional touches such as small period details, fabric, lighting, and small Colonial style furniture including tilt-top tables, the rush seated chairs, were encouraged.
In 1924, an article entitled The Charming Dutch Colonial Type suggested: “[I]n the Colonial home, old-fashioned furniture will give a charming atmosphere. Large four-poster beds, higher than the usual bed, fresh dotted Swiss curtains, brightly colored rag rugs, either round or oval shape, will go far towards fitting up an ideal but simple bedroom. Small legged tables or chairs, a little desk, painted or lacquered, may be placed in odd corners of a room of Colonial type, to brighten it up perceptibly. Every piece of furniture which is brought for the house should be appropriate, not only in being Colonial, but also by being well proprotioned to the size of each room. Many homes are utterly ruined, when furnished improperly. If the owner would bear in mind that a good idea is to try to make the furnishings eclipse the architecture and even the grounds, he would never fail in having a beautiful and picturesque dwelling. Simplicity, but good judgment is the keynote.”

When you think of the prototypical 1960’s home you might think of something space- agey. All streamlined, geometric and monochromatic. Or maybe something shaggy with dingbats. But how wrong you would be (shame yourself. do it now)!

Most suburban homes in the early mid-century still clung to a colonial revival decor. Colonial revival (a less frilly but still traditional) style was considered stately, high class, and warm. There would be some flip accents sure (note Betty’s textiles: the curtains and blankets are more on the whimiscal side).

Most homes built in the early 1900’s, like the Drapers,  were relatively stripped down and lacked 18th century flourishes of the older homes. To achieve the traditional Colonial style designers and home makers were instructed to “paint the walls a soft tint such as ivory, parchment, green, or apricot.” . Additional touches such as small period details, fabric, lighting, and small Colonial style furniture including tilt-top tables, the rush seated chairs, were encouraged.

In 1924, an article entitled The Charming Dutch Colonial Type suggested: “[I]n the Colonial home, old-fashioned furniture will give a charming atmosphere. Large four-poster beds, higher than the usual bed, fresh dotted Swiss curtains, brightly colored rag rugs, either round or oval shape, will go far towards fitting up an ideal but simple bedroom. Small legged tables or chairs, a little desk, painted or lacquered, may be placed in odd corners of a room of Colonial type, to brighten it up perceptibly. Every piece of furniture which is brought for the house should be appropriate, not only in being Colonial, but also by being well proprotioned to the size of each room. Many homes are utterly ruined, when furnished improperly. If the owner would bear in mind that a good idea is to try to make the furnishings eclipse the architecture and even the grounds, he would never fail in having a beautiful and picturesque dwelling. Simplicity, but good judgment is the keynote.”

6:35pm  |  22 notes   |  mad men design |  decor |  colonial revival |  mad men season 1 |  furniture 
September 29, 2009
Welcome to the Draper’s new living room (which I’m not too crazy about. It’s kind of like Kelly Wearstler on Thorazine! Bring back Dot!):
*A Chinoiserie breakfront — French name for ‘Chinese Style’ cabinet. Sometimes this style is called Chinese regency.
*Japanese influenced Dunbar couch — a low slung and brass footed couch is a staple of Mid Century design. I assume the ‘Japan’ twist are the sharp angled armrests.
*Dupoini Silk drapes — This is the shiny silk that’s also used to make prom dresses.
*Murano vases — glass blown Venetian style; transparent kind.
*Drexel endtable —  Drexel was a rung up the class ladder from Crate & Barrel in its day.
*The wall paper is Eggplant colored grasscloth.
*Then, of course, the Victorian fainting couch for the woozy lady in a constricting corset.

Welcome to the Draper’s new living room (which I’m not too crazy about. It’s kind of like Kelly Wearstler on Thorazine! Bring back Dot!):

*A Chinoiserie breakfront — French name for ‘Chinese Style’ cabinet. Sometimes this style is called Chinese regency.

*Japanese influenced Dunbar couch — a low slung and brass footed couch is a staple of Mid Century design. I assume the ‘Japan’ twist are the sharp angled armrests.

*Dupoini Silk drapes — This is the shiny silk that’s also used to make prom dresses.

*Murano vases — glass blown Venetian style; transparent kind.

*Drexel endtable —  Drexel was a rung up the class ladder from Crate & Barrel in its day.

*The wall paper is Eggplant colored grasscloth.

*Then, of course, the Victorian fainting couch for the woozy lady in a constricting corset.

4:22am  |  27 notes   |  Mad Men Season 3 |  Decor |  Design 
September 24, 2009
The happy warrior and the gentleman solider.

The happy warrior and the gentleman solider.

3:34am  |  6 notes   |  Mad Men Season 3 |  Lane Pryce |  Decor |  Design