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Today's Inspiration

July 24, 2010
If you are throwing a Mad Men viewing party for the Most Important Night of our Eyes and Soul, you should be asking yourself one question:
WHAT WOULD EMILY POST DO?*
Well, fortunately, the lovely ladies at the Emily Post institute have planned out a whole party for you. Including your manners:

First of all, a hostess must show each of her guests equal and impartial attention.  Engrossed in the person she is talking to, she must be able to notice anything amiss that may occur. No matter what goes wrong she must cover it as best as she may, and at the same time cover the fact that she is covering it. To give hectic directions merely accentuates the awkwardness.

Click for more Postian insight! It’s truly lovely. 
*Additional questions you can ask yourself: is there anything that could protect these characters from the throes of history? Would Ken Cosgrove make a good boyfriend? If the show depicts the chaotic transition from the Eisenhower era to the counter culture revolution of the 1960’s, what transitional moment are we in? Where is Paul Kinsey?!

If you are throwing a Mad Men viewing party for the Most Important Night of our Eyes and Soul, you should be asking yourself one question:

WHAT WOULD EMILY POST DO?*

Well, fortunately, the lovely ladies at the Emily Post institute have planned out a whole party for you. Including your manners:

First of all, a hostess must show each of her guests equal and impartial attention.  Engrossed in the person she is talking to, she must be able to notice anything amiss that may occur. No matter what goes wrong she must cover it as best as she may, and at the same time cover the fact that she is covering it. To give hectic directions merely accentuates the awkwardness.

Click for more Postian insight! It’s truly lovely. 

*Additional questions you can ask yourself: is there anything that could protect these characters from the throes of history? Would Ken Cosgrove make a good boyfriend? If the show depicts the chaotic transition from the Eisenhower era to the counter culture revolution of the 1960’s, what transitional moment are we in? Where is Paul Kinsey?!

8:49pm  |  31 notes   |  Emily Post |  Dinner Parties |  Betty Draper |  Joan Holloway 
September 4, 2009
Give ‘em a pair of studs.

Give ‘em a pair of studs.

8:34pm  |  6 notes   |  Mad Men Bookshelf |  Emily Post 
Joan’s husband teases her about her instance on dinner party seating arrangements. He sarcastically dubs her ‘Emily Post.’
Most mid-century women would swoon from such a comment.
Post got her start teaching the moneyed classes of the 1930’s how to plan a wedding, lift a spoon, and choose a butler. During the 1940’s her books on ettiquite were supossedly the most requested book by wives of GI’s. By 1950, a survey of female reporters identified Post as the second most influential woman in America, just after Eleanor Roosevelt.
Though Joan’s hubby was being derisive,  Joan’s adherence to Post’s manners (we can assume gleaning from her character) is motivated by more than stuffy traditions. In the words of the maven herself:
 “Manners are made up of trivialities of deportment which can be easily learned if one does not happen to know them; manner is personality—the outward manifestation of one’s innate character and attitude toward life.”  
Here’s a fabulous excerpt from a 1931 edition of ‘Etiquette’. 

Joan’s husband teases her about her instance on dinner party seating arrangements. He sarcastically dubs her ‘Emily Post.’

Most mid-century women would swoon from such a comment.

Post got her start teaching the moneyed classes of the 1930’s how to plan a wedding, lift a spoon, and choose a butler. During the 1940’s her books on ettiquite were supossedly the most requested book by wives of GI’s. By 1950, a survey of female reporters identified Post as the second most influential woman in America, just after Eleanor Roosevelt.

Though Joan’s hubby was being derisive,  Joan’s adherence to Post’s manners (we can assume gleaning from her character) is motivated by more than stuffy traditions. In the words of the maven herself:

 “Manners are made up of trivialities of deportment which can be easily learned if one does not happen to know them; manner is personality—the outward manifestation of one’s innate character and attitude toward life.”  

Here’s a fabulous excerpt from a 1931 edition of ‘Etiquette’. 

8:19pm  |  11 notes   |  Joan Holloway |  Emily Post |  Mad Men Bookshelf