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Today's Inspiration

June 15, 2010
Hey! Red won the Tony for Best Play!
It’s a marvelous work about our favorite Resident Tortured Haunted Genius Painter: Mark Rothko.

The play is set in 1958, in Rothko’s New York studio where he is at work on set of massive murals commissioned by the Four Season’s hotel. Under the watchful gaze of his new assistant, the two argue about art, commercialism, success, failure, and all sorts of fascinating creative dilemmas. After all, Rothko had received one the largest comissions the New York art world had seen to paint pictures for a hotel’s high end restaurant. The moral quandrys abound!

Good plays about inspired works of art make for damn fine writing. Here is, by far, one the best description’s of Rothko’s work I’ve read to date. William Boyd, Independent

"Rothko’s paintings display, in the jargon of the art world, "frontality". There is no attempt to violate the two-dimensional plane – no depth, no perspective; any semi-figurative explanation is robustly prohibited (no empty beach and sky, no cloudscape, here). All evaluation of this type of pure abstract art is reduced to one’s reaction and appreciation – or not – of the colour tones and relationships and the compositional balance or imbalance of the respective blocks of colour. There is nothing wrong with this: pure abstraction, if it is to be appreciated correctly, has to be judged on the strict terms it offers the viewer. To say "that was the colour of the wall in my bedroom when I was a sick child", or "to me blue equals misery", or "that reminds me of a sunset in Crete" is redundant. But in Rothko’s case that was never enough. A bombastic, opinionated intellectual, Rothko wanted his simple, extremely beautiful paintings to be freighted with mythic, portentous significance – to be about the despair at the heart of the human condition, doom, entropy, the void and oblivion. Undertaking the Four Seasons commission, he famously declared that he wanted to put all the rich bastards dining there off their food."


Rothko, ultimately too disturbed by notion of his high-minded work being displayed in a such a banal setting like a restaurant, decided to give back the $35,000 he was paid and refused to have his paintings hung.

Hey! Red won the Tony for Best Play!

It’s a marvelous work about our favorite Resident Tortured Haunted Genius Painter: Mark Rothko.

The play is set in 1958, in Rothko’s New York studio where he is at work on set of massive murals commissioned by the Four Season’s hotel. Under the watchful gaze of his new assistant, the two argue about art, commercialism, success, failure, and all sorts of fascinating creative dilemmas. After all, Rothko had received one the largest comissions the New York art world had seen to paint pictures for a hotel’s high end restaurant. The moral quandrys abound!

Good plays about inspired works of art make for damn fine writing. Here is, by far, one the best description’s of Rothko’s work I’ve read to date. William Boyd, Independent

"Rothko’s paintings display, in the jargon of the art world, "frontality". There is no attempt to violate the two-dimensional plane – no depth, no perspective; any semi-figurative explanation is robustly prohibited (no empty beach and sky, no cloudscape, here). All evaluation of this type of pure abstract art is reduced to one’s reaction and appreciation – or not – of the colour tones and relationships and the compositional balance or imbalance of the respective blocks of colour. There is nothing wrong with this: pure abstraction, if it is to be appreciated correctly, has to be judged on the strict terms it offers the viewer. To say "that was the colour of the wall in my bedroom when I was a sick child", or "to me blue equals misery", or "that reminds me of a sunset in Crete" is redundant. But in Rothko’s case that was never enough. A bombastic, opinionated intellectual, Rothko wanted his simple, extremely beautiful paintings to be freighted with mythic, portentous significance – to be about the despair at the heart of the human condition, doom, entropy, the void and oblivion. Undertaking the Four Seasons commission, he famously declared that he wanted to put all the rich bastards dining there off their food."


Rothko, ultimately too disturbed by notion of his high-minded work being displayed in a such a banal setting like a restaurant, decided to give back the $35,000 he was paid and refused to have his paintings hung.


3:17pm  |  36 notes   |  rothko |  art |  dyna moe |  red |  modern art 
November 9, 2009
When they showed the shot of a Farmer Whitman arguing with the farm co-operative it looked like it could transposed over the 1885 Potato Eaters painting by Van Gogh.
It’s one of Van Gogh’s most famous early works.  His intention was to stay within the Dutch style of documenting peasent life. But instead of a rustic, idyllic scene of apple cheeked farm hands, Van Gogh depicted his toiling workers in an un-sentimentalized, dreary and ugly light (because, you know, most peasents’ lives are none too glamorous as evidenced by the jug swilling Whitmans).
He wrote in a letter about the painting:
I have tried to make it clear how those people, eating their potatoes under the lamplight, have dug the earth with those very hands they put in their dish, and so it speaks of manual labor, and how they have honestly earned their food. I have wanted to give the impression of quite a different way of living than that of us civilized people. Therefore I am not at all anxious for everyone to like it or to admire it at once.
It’s real Salt of the Earth stuff.
Oh, and make sure to wash your hands when handling the Rothko.

When they showed the shot of a Farmer Whitman arguing with the farm co-operative it looked like it could transposed over the 1885 Potato Eaters painting by Van Gogh.

It’s one of Van Gogh’s most famous early works.  His intention was to stay within the Dutch style of documenting peasent life. But instead of a rustic, idyllic scene of apple cheeked farm hands, Van Gogh depicted his toiling workers in an un-sentimentalized, dreary and ugly light (because, you know, most peasents’ lives are none too glamorous as evidenced by the jug swilling Whitmans).

He wrote in a letter about the painting:

I have tried to make it clear how those people, eating their potatoes under the lamplight, have dug the earth with those very hands they put in their dish, and so it speaks of manual labor, and how they have honestly earned their food. I have wanted to give the impression of quite a different way of living than that of us civilized people. Therefore I am not at all anxious for everyone to like it or to admire it at once.

It’s real Salt of the Earth stuff.

Oh, and make sure to wash your hands when handling the Rothko.

2:32am  |  24 notes   |  Mad Men Season 3 |  Van Gogh |  Rothko |  Art 
August 17, 2009
The Dream of the Fisherman’s Wife is an erotic woodcut made around 1820 by the Japanese artist Hokusai. 
A shot of the work printed on a postcard that is being looked at by Anaïs Nin at the beginning of the 1990 film Henry & June earned the movie the very first NC-17 film rating.
The significance of the absence of men in fishermen’s villages is also testified to by the fact that the first dildos were found in fishermen’s villages.
(via)

The Dream of the Fisherman’s Wife is an erotic woodcut made around 1820 by the Japanese artist Hokusai

A shot of the work printed on a postcard that is being looked at by Anaïs Nin at the beginning of the 1990 film Henry & June earned the movie the very first NC-17 film rating.

The significance of the absence of men in fishermen’s villages is also testified to by the fact that the first dildos were found in fishermen’s villages.

(via)

2:14pm  |  201 notes   |  art |  decor