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Today's Inspiration

April 8, 2012
OFFICE SHOT AT DDB
"Bill Bernbach had the nerve and the wit to hire me in 1959. Some years later, I had the nerve and the wit to hire Bob Kuperman. Neither event made any headlines. Typically, people made headlines when they left Doyle Dane Bernbach, not when they got hired.”
What happened in the interim was not magic. We breathed each other’s air, celebrated each other’s triumphs and wept over each other’s failures. (A triumph meant that Bernbach had OK’d an ad, a failure meant that he hadn’t.)
Bernbach’s disciples learned the lesson. So I wept in David Reider’s office and in Helmut Krone’s, beamed for Phyllis Robinson and Julian Koenig, and generally felt my way around.
I also got lucky. Volkswagen came my way because I had worked for a few months for a Volkswagen dealer, and because Koenig left the agency and because Reider couldn’t get along with Krone. I did El Al because I was born to.
I assaulted people in the halls, begging for work. I loved the business, and DDB people around the world knew it.” —By Bob Levenson, Former Creative Director & Chairman DDB International

OFFICE SHOT AT DDB

"Bill Bernbach had the nerve and the wit to hire me in 1959. Some years later, I had the nerve and the wit to hire Bob Kuperman. Neither event made any headlines. Typically, people made headlines when they left Doyle Dane Bernbach, not when they got hired.

What happened in the interim was not magic. We breathed each other’s air, celebrated each other’s triumphs and wept over each other’s failures. (A triumph meant that Bernbach had OK’d an ad, a failure meant that he hadn’t.)

Bernbach’s disciples learned the lesson. So I wept in David Reider’s office and in Helmut Krone’s, beamed for Phyllis Robinson and Julian Koenig, and generally felt my way around.

I also got lucky. Volkswagen came my way because I had worked for a few months for a Volkswagen dealer, and because Koenig left the agency and because Reider couldn’t get along with Krone. I did El Al because I was born to.

I assaulted people in the halls, begging for work. I loved the business, and DDB people around the world knew it.” —By Bob Levenson, Former Creative Director & Chairman DDB International

9:49pm  |  19 notes   |  Bernbach |  ddb |  volkswagen 
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